Authenticity

I attended all three days of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) last weekend. Exhausting. I’m not used to being around hundreds of people for thirteen hours a day. I attended a few stellar workshops—Nancy Werlin’s cutting and revising presentation stands out—and a few mediocre ones. There were quite a lot of presentations on the “getting-your-book-published” side of things and a friend of mine noted that this conference is always an uneasy mixture of craft and marketing. Because of course, books need readers and from the publisher point of view the more the better.

But what makes a book sell? No one really knows, oddly enough, hence the headlong rush to copy the style of the latest best seller. But I think there is a thread that that runs through all extraordinary books and that thread is authenticity. The author has something to say and says it: truthfully, honestly, and often, painfully.

 dorothea langeAuthenticity sells because authenticity connects and the one thing that connects us all is our human condition. If a story is written authentically, readers connect to it. They sense its inherent honesty and by transmission, its inherent value to their lives.

America’s timeless stories—The Grapes of Wrath and To Kill a Mockingbird come to mind—burn with the author’s passion. John Steinbeck and Harper Lee wrote from their hearts, not from the publishing pulse. They wrote because they had something to say and they said it. Authenticity, in both these books, rings like lead crystal tapped.

When we write authentically, we write from the very base of human longing and it is that longing which not only connects us all, but to which we long to be connected.

Dorothea Lange - Sharecropper's cabin and sharecropper's wife, ten miles south of Jackson, Mississippi, 1937

photos by Dorothea Lange

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8 thoughts on “Authenticity

  1. Great post, Deb. I don’t think I’ve considered that on such an encompassing level. I loved your comment, “Authenticity, in both these books, rings like lead crystal tapped.”
    Hugs,
    teagan

  2. Thanks Teagan! I think I realized that after reviewing so many books and the ones that got negative or mixed reviews were the ones that seemed muddy somehow.

  3. Just found your site through your “like” at mine. 🙂 I love this post. Something I’m trying to work on… Thank you for this beautiful reminder that when we write “truthfully, honestly, and often, painfully,” is when we connect more to the deep longings of readers.

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