Stephen King is My Boss

Regular followers of my blog may be wondering why:

A) I am posting on a Monday and

B) what this blog post is about, anyway.

I’ve been tagged by the wonderful Sharon Roat sharonwrote.blogspot.com for the My Writing Process Blog Tour, and when tagged, the tagee answers four questions in a blog post about their writing process. Here goes.

 

Stephen King is not technically my boss, and, actually, I haven’t even read any of his fiction because when I saw the movie “Carrie” it scared me so badly that I swore off reading anything by him. Until I picked up his memoir of the craft: On Writing. I’m a sucker for plain speaking because it respects and assumes intelligence in the recipient. On Writing is plain speaking—honest, confident and funny. It was a book I could believe in, and a work ethic I could respect (minus the early drug abuse) so I modeled my working day after his.

What am I working on? 

I’m working on three things:

—a young adult novel told in three voices that includes a terrifying sailing adventure, some betrayal, some seriously bad decision-making—but is ultimately about the transcending individuation brought about by courage.

—A middle grade mystery featuring a twelve-year-old boy, his younger sisters, a missing father and a bunch of quantum physics.

—And a picture book that I am also illustrating about a suburban girl who finds a home in the natural world after being relocated to the woods by her wacky new-age parents.

How does my work differ from others in its genres?

The YA is mostly in verse and as my writing group likes to point out, it is a verse novel with tension (!!). I pitch it as Out of the Dust meets The Perfect Storm.

The middle grade has the quantum physics aspect that can almost be interpreted as magical realism, but not quite. I ran it by my older brother (who, in the ‘80’s, was completing his PhD in artificial intelligence at Stanford when he was wooed away by a dot com company. He doesn’t have to work anymore) and the science, weird as it is, he says is legit.

In the picture book, Iris, the protagonist, is the straight-man to her parents wackiness; she’s got agency up the wazoo and it also has the theme—near and dear to my heart—of getting kids out into nature.

Why do I write what I do?

I’m no spring chicken and I’ve had a lot of life experiences.

The YA is, as they say, “inspired by true events.” I knew it would make a good story the moment all the (real) pieces fell into place. The MG was an experiment. Mr. Stephen King told me (through his book) that he writes 2000 words a day; he just forges ahead, day after day. So that’s what I did. I had one image—three kids in a canoe find a blue artifact in a swamp—and from the there, I just wrote.

And the PB: “inspired by true events.”

I guess I write what I do because I like to think and I’ve got a lot of raw material.

How does my writing process work?

At 9AM I sit down in front of my computer and work until 11AM, when I have ‘elevenses.’ After elevenses, I go to work until 1PM, by which time I have hopefully written 2000 words, or I must continue to work. That’s it. Six days a week. Sometimes I draw if it’s a picture book I’m working on. Sometimes I’m on a deadline for a book review and work on that instead. But I find writing consistently is a better schedule for my muse.

“I believe that every story is attended by its own sprite, whose voice we embody when we tell the tale, and that we tell it more successfully if we approach the sprite with a certain degree of respect and courtesy. These sprites are both old and young, male and female, sentimental and cynical, skeptical and credulous, and so on, and what’s more, they’re completely amoral. . .the story-sprites are willing to serve whoever has the ring, whoever is telling the tale.”

I’m afraid I don’t remember who wrote that, but don’t you just love it.

For next week, I’ve tagged Heather Knight Richard, gal extraordinaire.

Heather grew up near the banks of the Connecticut River in Western Massachusetts, quite literally in the family’s pizza shop. Her historical novel in verse, FLY TO THE HILLS, is the story of a mill girl who works downstream from a faulty reservoir dam, and it recently earned Heather the SCBWI Student Writer Scholarship. In May Heather graduated with an MFA in Writing for Children from Simmons College. She lives and works in the same town where she once sold pizza, now as the parent of five young children (including two sets of twins!). www.hknightrichard.com

 

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8 thoughts on “Stephen King is My Boss

  1. I’m thinking about reading it again. Sometimes I wish I could just call him up and invite him over–I could have a G&T; he could have a T and we would talk books and writing!

  2. Your WIPs sound so interesting. Anything about sailing I love. I’m working on a MG series about a family that sails around the world. Anything with quantum physics is also a draw for me. Loved “A Wrinkle in Time”

  3. Oh, yes A Wrinkle in Time is just about perfect!
    I would love to read a story about a family that sails around the world! Get that out quickly!

  4. I love horror, so I’ve read a fair bit of Stephen King anyway. I also love his book ‘On Writing’ and I see it’s the writing bible for many writers.

  5. Stephen King is brilliant. I’ve read many of his novels, I guess I am lucky because I don’t scare easily and horror is one of my favorite genre’s. He transcends horror though, his works are much much more and I love how his non horror works even more. The Green Mile was amazing, Shawshank, Dolores Claiborne, I could go on and on.

  6. Pingback: Big Talker | Debra Paulson

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