Looking for Likes in all the Wrong Places

I like it when lots of people read my posts, something I know by looking at my stats thingies. But I am not comfortable with it. It’s not that I don’t like that lots of people are reading what I’ve written—after all, writing needs readers. It’s that I don’t like liking that lots of people are reading what I’ve written.

Recently I found an archive with all the interviews with writers The Paris Review published through its decades. William Styron, before he was WILLIAM STYRON and just a young author with a first novel, found the writing life wrought with self-doubt and therefore very hard work and so he usually wrote in the afternoons with a hangover, because what he really liked was to stay up late and get drunk. But Styron, despite insecurity and self-doubt, despite hangovers, despite the not knowing whether his writing was any good or not, wrote.

Because if you’re a writer, you write. And you do this on trust, and especially without validation. Your insecurity is the knife-edge that pierces the self-complacent ego and allows the honesty to emerge.

These days with social media, we have the opportunity to post clever drivel that panders to a culture of “likes” and get instant validation for it. Human nature being what it is, why put yourself through the agony of writing and reaching for your non-validated best when you can be “liked” for a quick and clever effort? That’s the problem for writers, and there’s no solution except to be aware of it.

If you want to create the good stuff, you have to suffer in a vacuum of non-validation. I’m sorry, but that’s just the way it is.

 

I-must-write-it-all-out

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7 thoughts on “Looking for Likes in all the Wrong Places

  1. I just happened upon this today as I was thinking how much I like being “liked” on Facebook and how out of hand it’s become. I’m going to take a little break from it (Facebook). I want to pursue my love of writing and perhaps need to dwell in that vacuum for a time.

  2. Thanks for this. I find my life is less fraught and more balanced sans Facebook. Good for you to resolve to dwell in creative solitude–I think you’ll be rewarded!

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